PLEN: Women in Public Policy

Julianna Pasquarello majors in economics and political science, and is interested in a career in public policy and law. She recently attended Public Leadership Education Network (PLEN) Women in Public Policy seminar, thanks to a grant from Newcomb College Institute (NCI).

 

Tell us about yourself and why you wanted to attend the PLEN conference:

Coming to college, I understood my passions (law, advocacy, helping others) and my strengths (writing, critical-thinking, problem-solving, and leadership). Despite these understandings, I was still unsure of how exactly I could apply these passions and strengths into a job which both captured my interests and accomplished real-time change. Young adults such as me are often presented with many life-impacting questions such as “What do you wish to accomplish in your life? What do you want to do when you grow up?” Yet without the proper connections to help understand exactly what means exist to accomplish these goals, it can be extremely difficult to find answers to them. My search for answers attracted me to PLEN. Under the recommendation of Heather Johnson, a professor at Newcomb College Institute, I applied for a grant to attend PLEN and took a leap of faith to understand exactly what I wish to accomplish later in life and how I needed to move further along its path.

What were your favorite parts of the conference?

My favorite parts of the conference were the speakers who came to discuss their experiences in public policy. Some of my favorite speakers included:

  1. Meredith​ ​Singer​ (Government and Regulatory Affairs Executive at IBM): Meredith serves as a liaison between the federal government and IBM. This plays greatly into her advocacy for IBM “dreamers,” who are now in jeopardy of losing their residency status.
  2. Amy​ ​Marmer​ ​Nice (independent Immigration Policy Advisor & Executive Director of Immigration Policy at the US Chamber of Commerce): A Tulane alumni, Amy has over 25 years of experience advocating on behalf of immigration reform. Speaking to someone with a similar background and education as myself was particularly inspiring.
  3. Marcy​ ​Mistrett​ ​(CEO at the Campaign for Youth Justice since 2014): Marcy created ”The Campaign for Youth Justice” which advocates to end youth being charged, sentenced and incarcerated as adults and has led a change in more than 30 states who changed their laws making it more difficult to prosecute children as adults. Ms. Mistrett was a living example of how following your passion to advocate for others and seeing faith in the potential of other individuals can create change.

 

Highlight a speaker or a job site you visited:

At PLEN, I had the opportunity to visit the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (“IWPR”) the leading think-tank in the U.S. that focuses on domestic women’s issues. The Institute for Women’s Policy Research’s reports and other informational resources have informed policies and programs across the U.S. which affect women’s health and participation in the workforce. At the Institute, I spoke to two researchers and I came to understand how research organizations play unique and important roles in policy formation. The Institute for Women’s Policy Research places an emphasis on its bipartisan approach as it is imperative to conduct research from an impartial point of view to most effectively inform policymakers who affect change. As a result of my experience, I see a future for myself in research with the ultimate goal to help create change.

Tell us what you learned that you hope to never forget:

PLEN taught me four important lessons:

  1. The most important work you do is when you are not on the ballot.
  2. Opportunity is another word for hard work. Do not overlook the small things.
  3. Your perceived personality is another person’s reality. Be aware of what you say, and how you say it.
  4. Politics, like all work, is local. Do not undervalue the people and network around you.

PLEN taught me that the combinations of hard work and understanding the value of the resources which surround you will lead you to a happy, successful career. I will carry these lessons with me going forward both at Tulane and later as both a professional and as an individual who wishes to affect changes.

Why should other students attend a PLEN conference?

Throughout my time at Tulane, I have met incredible women who possess great potential to enact change in this world. Each have their own dreams and continue to inspire me. I would advise these students to try to attend a PLEN conference because PLEN gives students the skills and connections to leverage this very potential which awes and inspires me every day.

To any female Tulane student reaching this: take a leap of faith and apply. Besides some of the obvious positives (such as visiting our nation’s Capital and meeting with legislators) PLEN truly is at the forefront of placing female leaders into contact with the right opportunities and people who can help them discover and accomplish their potential. Attending PLEN is not just an investment in your future, it is an investment in yourself.

 


Does this sound like something you might be interested in?  Tulane undergraduate students can apply to NCI for funding to attend PLEN conferences. Email Betsy Lopez at elopez@tulane.edu for more information.

Responses have been lightly edited for length and clarity.

 

Advertisements

PLEN: Women in STEM Policy

Ellyn Frohberg studies public health and psychology, and is interested in a career in science and healthcare policy, policy research, or mental health. She recently attended Public Leadership Education Network (PLEN)’s Women in STEM Policy seminar.

Describe yourself and why you wanted to attend the PLEN conference:

As a student, it is easy to feel helpless in implementing substantial and sustainable change. My interest in attending the Women in STEM Policy PLEN workshop in Washington D.C. took root in my wish to streamline my goals and pinpoint what I can do to begin to create change in my community. I am increasingly interested in how policy can positively shape society, and wanted to know how I can combine my interest in science with policy that is helpful and transformative.

Through an internship at an addiction recovery center, I recognized the need for policy that helps and supports those struggling with illness inside and outside of the clinic. I also recognized public health as the conduit that can provide the framework to protect vulnerable populations and prevent illness. Furthermore, I am passionate about establishing equity within healthcare.

What were your favorite parts of the conference?

My favorite parts of the conference included the networking opportunities during site visits. Meeting with professionals at organizations such as HRSA (Health Resources and Services Administration) and the NIH (National Institute of Health) increased my interest in the field and helped me to establish clear and achievable short and long term goals to best suit my interests and the needs of my intended career.

Highlight a speaker or a job site you visited:

I would like to highlight the Health Resources and Services Administration and the women who graciously hosted us for the afternoon we visited. This particular office space was filled with contagious passion for helping others. Each woman brought different skills and experiences to the table that expanded my vision of how incredible and influential we each have the power to be in our future careers.

Tell us what you learned that you hope to never forget:

I hope to never forget the importance of others in building a career. A good conversation, a true connection with a stranger, or a mentor can change your life if you are open to it.  Furthermore, there is room for everyone’s talents. Time with peers truly is better spent in fellowship with one another rather than in competition.

Why should other students attend a PLEN conference?

PLEN can provide the resources and connections you need to make tangible steps in determining what career path is right for you. I think, especially for STEM majors, students are not often introduced to options outside of medical school and research. This conference introduced me to all the options I have in STEM, and how my degree can help me to advance policy. I would also like to give a huge thank you to NCI. This experience was incredible, and I am so grateful for the support and funding.


Does this sound like something you might be interested in?  Tulane undergraduate students can apply to NCI for funding to attend PLEN conferences. Email Betsy Lopez at elopez@tulane.edu for more information.

Responses have been lightly edited for length and clarity.

PLEN: Women in STEM Policy

Meet Lauren Bartels! She majors in chemical engineering and is interested in environmental/sustainability science-policy work. She recently attended Public Leadership Education Network (PLEN)’s Women in STEM Policy seminar.

Describe yourself and why you wanted to attend the PLEN conference:

Ever since I was young, I knew I was destined to pursue a degree rooted in science. As I grew older, I began to realize the excitement I felt when tasked with any sort of challenge, so I looked for a degree which would serve to strengthen my critical-thinking skills. After much research, I declared a chemical engineering major and have not looked back.

Despite my love for engineering, I realized I wanted to utilize my degree beyond the typical engineering career paths. A previous summer internship in Washington, D.C. had introduced me to the world of science-policy, and I became eager to learn more about the intersection of these fields. I saw the Women in STEM Policy PLEN conference as a means for both broadening my knowledge of science-policy careers and introducing me to many respected women in the field.

What were your favorite parts of the conference?

I honestly enjoyed every aspect of the conference, as I learned so much more than I could have anticipated. However, one of my favorite parts was the fact I was constantly surrounded by powerful women who shared my passion for science-policy. Not only were all of the speakers and panelists renowned in their respective areas of expertise, but the other students attending the conference were extremely inspirational. Although the importance of science-driven policy cannot be overemphasized, the opportunities for scientists to influence politics often goes unaddressed. Scientists are severely underrepresented in influential government positions, so I was encouraged by the enthusiasm demonstrated by my peers.

Pic 1

Highlight a speaker or a job site you visited:

Although I am intrigued by all science-related polices, my particular interests revolve around environmental policies. One afternoon during the conference, we were split into small groups and sent to visit the location of an organization focused on a particular policy issue. My group was sent to the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF), which is an environmental advocacy group driven by scientific research. We were able to meet a variety of employees in their D.C. office in an informal atmosphere, where they educated us on the work of the EDF and answered any questions we had about the organization or science-policy in general. I gained valuable knowledge from this site visit, and the trip only strengthened my interest in environmental policy.

Tell us what you learned that you hope to never forget:

Although each of the panels throughout the seminar focused on a different topic, one question was repeatedly asked: how did you reach the career you hold today? Regardless of the specific career field, all answers emphasized the idea of “planned luck.” An individual must be active in pursuing diverse opportunities; however, one cannot predict where each opportunity will lead. I learned a career in science-policy does not result from particular choices throughout one’s education and early career but rather one’s eagerness to learn and desire to improve.

Why should other students attend a PLEN conference?

Women in STEM Policy was the specific PLEN conference I attended, but PLEN hosts numerous other conferences to prepare women for leadership positions in the public policy arena. Even if you are unsure you are interested in public policy, maintaining knowledge of the political process benefits many aspects of your life and enhances your ability to think critically about a variety of issues. Furthermore, networking is key, and PLEN allows you to meet many professionals and other students with extremely diverse backgrounds. No one will leave PLEN without learning something new and creating fond memories!

 


Does this sound like something you might be interested in?  Tulane undergraduate students can apply to NCI for funding to attend PLEN conferences. Email Betsy Lopez at elopez@tulane.edu for more information.

Responses have been lightly edited for length and clarity.

PLEN: Women in Public Policy

Meet Katie Donahue! She studies political science, social policy/practice, and Italian, and she’s interested in working in campaign finance or nonprofit fundraising. She recently attended Public Leadership Education Network (PLEN)’s Women in Public Policy seminar.
Tell us about yourself and why you wanted to attend the PLEN conference:
I’m a senior in the midst of a career search and thought that experiencing D.C. and hearing from those who held jobs I may be interested in or not know about would be a productive way to spend the last week of winter break! It was a really fulfilling experience and I enjoyed meeting Tulane students that attended the conference as well as those from universities across the country.
What were your favorite parts of the conference?
I really enjoyed the opportunity to network with my peers from other universities and hear about their studies. The breakout panels on immigration and criminal justice were fascinating, and the women who spoke to us on those issues were truly leaders in their fields. It was interesting to learn more about topics that I was interested in and to explore new areas in a setting like this conference.
617AC4C6-DC95-4934-9FA9-D2C277939F83
Highlight a speaker or a job site you visited:
One of my favorite speakers was Dr. Unique Morris-Hughes. She highlighted the importance of work at the local and state level, which can sometimes be portrayed as less important than federal work, but can truly be more impactful. She spoke to us like the responsible young adults we are and really took the time to address our concerns and questions.
Tell us what you learned that you hope to never forget:
The importance of networking and relationship building has been drilled into my head and I’m sure I won’t forget it soon! Another thing that became clear during the seminar is that there is truly no one path to success. We heard from so many wonderful women who had chosen vastly different schools, internships, and jobs, but all ended up in fantastic and fulfilling careers. As one of our speakers put it, it’s really more of a career “jungle gym” than a ladder.
Why should other students attend a PLEN conference?
PLEN did a great job of ensuring that we heard from people with very difference life paths and different opinions, so there really was something for everyone in the seminar. I learned so much about my professional and academic options and will definitely keep in touch with the peers and mentors I met.

Does this sound like something you might be interested in?  Tulane undergraduate students can apply to NCI for funding to attend PLEN conferences. Email Betsy Lopez at elopez@tulane.edu for more information.

Responses have been lightly edited for length and clarity.

Gray Lab Summer 2017 Conclusion

 Although my summer experience working in the Child and Family lab has come to a close, I have learned and accomplished so much that I will take with me not only into my comomchild-300x300ntinued research position for the upcoming year, but also in my course work, future career paths, and perspectives and interactions with people in my every day life. From achieving all of my initial summer learning goals, to learning lessons of the importance of relationships, resilience, context and self-awareness–this summer experience has challenged and rewarded me in ways I could not have imagined. 

In terms of of my specific learning objectives, the Gray lab supported me and gave me every opportunity to successfully achieve my goals. My first goal was to broaden my understanding of statistical analyses and SPSS software used to run such analyses and then applying that understanding to ours and others research. Thanks to the support of the NCI grant, I was able to get the SPSS software on my computer. That resource in conjunction  with the support of all the Gray lab graduate students, (whether they were sharing their SPSS instructional manuals with me, 
Screen Shot 2017-12-17 at 5.15.21 PM.pngoffering me tutorials involving tedious hours spent showing me how to run varying analyses, answering all of my questions, or sharing with me their own research project data analysis plans and results) I am now confident in both running my own statistical analysis, as well as interpreting the statistics and result tables of the empirical literature that I consume. Part of this first goal was to be able to use this acquired understanding to help the lab make some analyses choices as we shift focus from strictly data collection to analysis. I was able to achieve this goal by writing several syntaxes including ones for child community violence exposure, children’s’ hot self-regulation and children’s’ cool self-regulation. My second learning goal was to strengthen my participant recruitment skills and the administrative side of clinical psychology research. Although after this summer, another undergraduate will take over recruitment, recruitment was one of my favorite experiences I had in lab because it helped me connect the research beyond just participant ID numbers to real people with stories who are inconveniencing themselves to assist with our work. This appreciation and connection was one of the biggest lessons of the summer. My third learning goal was to develop my scientific reading and writing abilities. By the end of the summer I had successfully read and critically analyzed and discussed our weekly empirical article for lab meeting, presented and lead an article discussion during lab meeting, completed a literature review on self-regulation, and finished my honors thesis proposal. The Gray lab gave me the exposure, tools, support and challenge that I needed to gain confidence in my scientific reading and writing abilities. My fourth learning goal was to further my PSRA coding reliability and complete a systematic review of how past studies used PSRA data to inform analyses plan within our own research. Using the Interclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) measure to determine inter-rater reliability, by the end of the summer Hannah (our lead lab coordinator) and I were within an acceptable range of reliability and had made good progress and double coding PSRA videos. I completed my PSRA systematic review and started creating syntaxes to assist in our future data analyses. My final goal was to work closely to the graduate students and learn from them. This goal was easy to achieve due to the strong mentorship values the lab has, and without the support from all of the gray lab team–none of my above goals would have been attainable. 

So, now that I reached all my summer learning goals, what is next? Luckily, I get to continue working in the Gray Lab for the next to semesters! I hope to continue to build on my current experience as I endeavor to complete my senior year honors thesis. I am excited to see how the graduate student’s projects evolve as they take on their master thesis, dissertation and compositional research projects. I am excited to meet new people, as more undergraduate students join the lab and to give them any knowledge and support that I can to assist them on their research endeavors. Furthermore, if any readers are Tulane or New Orleans students interested in getting involved in undergraduate research projects–please feel free to contact me for any questions or support you may need in starting the process. I cannot reccomend the experience highly enough! Beyond the upcoming semesters, this summer experience has given me career goals of eventually pursuing graduate work in psychology so that I can best give back to both the field and my community. 

Beyond the skills I learned, the Gray Lab has also developed my concepts of social justice within and beyond the field of psychology. One lesson from the summer that particularly resonated with me was one surrounding cultural sensitivity and understanding the dangers of labeling and telling and recognizing only one story. During one of our weekly lab meetings we read the following article to guide our discussion about the risks of closed-minded labeling, particular within the work we do. In it, Nigerian writer Chimamanda Adichie beautifully captures how everyone gives labels and everyone has been singularly labeled to all of humanities detriment. Understanding this inherent misstep and consciously countering the instinct to make assumptions about someone’s identity is incredibly important in any field where you are interacting with people who may identify differently from you. In regards to psychological research this applies in many ways. Here is an interesting article that exemplifies this lesson by explaining and empirically supporting the dangers of focusing on one story in research by expanding trauma research beyond a strictly psychopathology maladaptive perspective to contextually adaptive strategies. These are just two examples of how the Gray Lab has challenged my biases and grown my perspectives on social justice and how to be a compassionate human. I will link our Lab Values here for further lessons that being a part of this lab has taught me. 

In terms of my goal and NCI’s mission of being a leading woman and an agent of positive change, working in the Gray Lab has taught me how to reach these goals by introducing me to inspiring models. Whether it was the mothers I talked to at the pediatric clinic, the administration and staff at the Head Start programs, my undergraduate research peers, the graduate students, or Dr. Gray herself, being constantly surrounding by incredible and hard working women with a diversity of skill sets and ways of contributing has helped me find my own voice and confidence in the field and beyond. I am so grateful for this experience, and I plan to apply what I have learned this past summer in all of my future endeavors 

 

Reflections on Perseverance with Lift

While working with Lift Louisiana, I’ve definitely learned the value of perseverance when working on long projects. I spent the better part of the semester–with sprinklings of other assignments, projects, and obligations–working on legislator profiles. Although the assignment was tedious at times and required an enormous amount of attention to detail, it was definitely an incredible awarding project. As I glance through the hundreds of legislator profiles I created for state representatives and senators from seven major Louisiana parishes on sexual education, abortion, and economic justice bills, the pay-off feels incredible. Not just because they’re finally finished after countless hours of bill searches, formatting crises, and color-coding, but because of their distinct usefulness.

As a political science major, conversations on abysmal voter turnout dominate many of my courses. The numbers prove truly sobering — nationally, 61.4% of eligible, registered voters (not including non-registered adults, undocumented folks, and people who face political disenfranchisement) turned out to the polls in 2016. This was a record high, going up by more than five percent since the last national election. In Louisiana, however, a sobering 14.27% of registered, eligible voters actually voted in 2017. For local, parish-based elections, this number rarely is any higher (with most voter turnout rates hovering between 8% and 15%).

Of that small sub-section of eligible voters who even vote, the number who make politically informed decisions likely proves even lower. Due to busy schedules; the lack of accessibility of political information; and the role of media coverage in shaping our perception of candidates and legislation, the average voter rarely spends a great deal of time combing through all of this information. And even for folks who have the privilege of time, energy, and political knowledge to go through all of this information and make their own decisions about policies and politicians, the sheer amount of proposed bills and policies that occur on local, state, and national levels makes this even harder.

So, while these legislator profiles took hours to complete and possibly more emotional than physical energy to get through, I see their worth very vividly. They provide community members and registered voters with an easy, one-page, digestible piece of information about the voting histories of current Louisiana legislators. Not only do they provide all of the information that took dozens of bill searches to find in one place, but they allow voters to make their own, informed decisions about candidates based on the candidates’ own voting decisions over the course of the last three (almost four years). And that–despite the tediousness–makes it all worth it to me. Especially since I got the opportunity to learn a TON of information about Louisiana legislators!

First semester at Lift Louisiana: Reflecting and Forward Looking

As my first semester with Lift Louisiana comes to a close, I am so happy to reflect on what I have done thus far and so excited when looking forward to my plans for next semester.

This semester, I launched the pilot of the #MyLASexEd campaign on Tulane’s campus. This involved a revamp of the campaign’s website, the creation of a social media toolkit for the campaign, the creation and hosting of a webinar about the campaign, as well as the story-collecting and data entry from the campaign launch proper. I was able to collect stories from students at Tulane, which will be used for future advocacy and lobbying for sex ed reform in Louisiana. It was so exciting to watch my hard work pay off and see the stories that students had to share with me about their sex ed experiences, both good and bad. This all made it very apparent that Lousiana can do better, and we need to keep fighting to ensure that they do, in fact, do better.

Next semester, the campaign will be focusing on two main components. First, we will be expanding the scope of the campaign on Tulane’s campus. We will move from simple story-collecting that we’ve been doing through our photo campaign to a full video campaign. The goal is to find groups of interested students from all over the country, both Louisiana and elsewhere, and have them sit down for small group discussions related to their sex ed experiences. These small groups will be videotaped, and we will use these video recordings for future advocacy purposes. The second component of the campaign moving into the next semester is spreading the campaign to other campuses. I hosted a webinar earlier in the semester to teach other students on other campuses about the campaign and am now working with students from LSU, LSU Shreveport and Loyola to launch the campaign there. I’m excited for this expansion so that we can both get students all over the state involved in important activism, as well as collect as many stories as possible.

My time at Lift so far has been so educational and I have truly enjoyed doing such important work to improve sex ed statewide. I look forward to expanding on this work next semester and seeing where this project can help take our advocacy.

Launching #MyLASexEd at Tulane

15 Barry McGuireRecently, I had the pleasure of launching a campaign for Lift Louisiana, which we call the #MyLASexEd campaign. The campaign centers around collecting stories from students in Louisiana about their sex ed experiences so that we can see what is working and what isn’t to best prepare and educate our students. This semester, my two main goals were to launch the campaign at Tulane, as well as start outreach to other campus leaders to work on launching the campaign state-wide in the spring.

Earlier in November, I created and hosted a webinar for campus leaders all around Louisiana to teach them about the campaign. Students from all over the state are excited and interested in pursuing the campaign, and now I am working closely with them so that the campaign can launch full-scale next semester. We will be launching #MyLASexEd at LSU, LSU Shreveport and Loyola New Orleans next semester. This means we will both be spreading the message about the importance of comprehensive sex ed statewide, but also collecting experiences from students from all over Louisiana.

In addition to outreach, I launched #MyLASexEd on Tulane’s campus in mid-November. For one week, I tabled on Tulane’s campus daily to collect stories, experiences and selfies from students from all over the nation to compare their sex ed experiences. We collected around 20 stories in total and are looking to collect even more next semester. From the students we spoke to, it became clear that students from New Orleans, when compared to students from other parts of the country, like L.A. or Chicago, were not receiving a very valuable sex ed experience. Many students from Louisiana told me that they either could not remember anything they learned in sex ed, or that they were taught abstinence and nothing else. Very few, if any, of them reported to me that they learned about STIs, safe sex, consent, birth control or healthy sexual relationships. When compared to other students’ stories, such as learning about the prevalence of STIs and how to avoid them, or how to put a condom on and use different forms of birth control, it is clear that students from Louisiana are missing out on some parts of sex ed that could really help them down the road. Interestingly, even students who reported having what they claimed to be fairly comprehensive sex ed stated that they did not learn about non-heterosexual sexual relationships in their sex ed, so it appears as though that is something that could be improved upon nationwide.

I am so excited to have started the process of launching this campaign, and I am so excited to see where we can take it, and the stories we collected, in the future. The goal is to use these stories to present to lawmakers about how Louisiana’s sex ed programs are failing their students. Thus far, the evidence that I have gathered make this clear, and I am excited to start to use these stories to fight for change in LA.

Continuing Web-Based Sex Ed Research

During the past several weeks in my internship with Dr. Lederer I finished working on a second poster for her APHA conference presentation, pictured, and continued to work on my literature review.

APHA Graphic Images Poster Draft2

I thought I was nearly done with my literature review several weeks ago because there did not appear to be that many relevant sources. However, through reading many of the articles, it seems like a broader variety of topics might be relevant to understanding web-based sex education interventions. Several of the main points I have learned are that web-based interventions are designed for a variety of settings, including schools (which is most pertinent for Dr. Lederer’s work), but also to be used in combination with community-based classes or clinic visits. Digital games are also a popular new type of sex education method, but researchers are unsure how effective they are, or what components of the video games makes them most effective. It also seems that many web-based interventions are successful at increasing health knowledge and safer sex attitudes in the short run, but it is unclear if one-time interventions are capable of producing long term attitude or behavior change. The overall message is that the efficacy of digital sex education interventions is dependent on a variety of factors and much more research needs to be done. This is good rationale for doing the study on Dr. Lederer’s data that this literature builds up to. I am excited to start working on data analysis early next semester!

Sharing my work as a researcher and reproductive rights advocate

I cannot believe I am over halfway through the Reproductive Rights and Reproductive Health Internship for the semester. My work with Dr. Lederer has been an invaluable exposure to sexuality health education. Last blog, I wrote about the strides I have made in my scientific writing. At each weekly meeting, Dr. Lederer and I add to the manuscript, refining the introduction, methodology, and results. I value the collaborative process, as I have learned from her feedback and writing style, and I hope these skills will inform future projects. Once, these sections are more solidified and polished, we will begin the work on the discussion where we can not only interpret findings and compare results to previous work, but also explain the implications of the research of sexuality education knowledge gaps and how health professionals can mitigate knowledge deficiencies.

As discussed previously, working on the manuscript has improved my scientific writing. The final product will be submitted to a scientific sexuality health education journal whose readership is primarily composed of researchers, clinicians, and educators to hopefully guide improved education practices. Nevertheless, writing for public audiences can be just as important as academic groups. Over the summer, the Media Specialist at the Newcomb College Institute asked to feature my work as a Reproductive Rights and Reproductive Health Intern in NEWCOMB Magazine. I was elated at the opportunity to share my internship experience with others. Over Homecoming weekend, the magazine was distributed and Newcomb alumni and Tulane parents read about my personal and academic progress from the internship.

In my short article, I discussed the individual projects that I completed or was working on with Dr. Lederer as well as the broader implications of the internship experience. I wrote of connection to a group of women leaders that shares the same passion for reproductive justice, but developed the interest from diverse pathways. I discussed the inspiring professionals who took time out of their work days to speak about health, housing, economic, and criminal justice issues and explained the obvious and (often) not so apparent connection of their work to reproductive justice. I am so grateful to be featured in the magazine and not only share my development as a researcher, but also my growth as a reproductive rights advocate. I will continue to share my engagement with the field whether it is in print, online, or in person.

The full article can be found below on page 20.